Tuesday

Let's trade foods!


We maintain our large free range flock of chickens, so we can have eggs to eat all year. Since we have a good size flock, there are enough hens that there are usually at least a few hens laying,  even in the dark of winter.  At other times of the year the number of eggs goes up to around 30 a day, and we find ourselves craving other types of food to eat than eggs. 


We figured other people out there might be in the situation, of having too much  of something really good to eat, that they produce, or have an abundance of, and that they might like to trade for our hens eggs.  








We would like to trade these eggs for food items like:

Smoked Mussels (vacuum packed)

Smoked Oysters (vacuum packed) 
Oyster Mushrooms
Shitakki Mushrooms
Chestnuts
Walnuts
All kinds of Nuts

Grass Fed Beef
All types of Jerky
Homemade Sausage
Good cheeses, (not American Process, etc)

Avocados
Caviar . . .

 If you are interested in trying them email us  to suggest a trade. 

  The eggs come from a small flock of chickens, who browse freely in the  forest all day.




  The eggs come from a small flock of chickens, who browse freely in the  forest all day.
Browsing for food is great exercise for chickens and is important for their health and fitness, which positively affects the quality of the eggs.
Our hens browse in a forest of Oak, Fir, and Maple trees. We keep the flock small, so the forest is able to regenerate, and continue to contribute to the diets of the hens. Instead of using fixed feeding stations we   "Forest Feed"  them their grain ration by scattering whole grains and seeds on the forest floor.  While eating their grain on the forest floor the chickens find natural chicken foods like, mosses, lichens, bugs, worms, and dirt to eat in combination with the seeds and grains they are eating. We want the chickens to scratch and peck for most of their food, because we believe that the exercise hens get scratching in the woods for their food is almost as important to egg quality as what they eat. Eating slowly and exercising promotes better digestion, so the hens can pass the food's nutrients to the eggs. It also seems that the hens that spend more time scratching around in the woods produce harder shells, with deeper yellow yolks. 



  If you are interested in trying them email us  to suggest a trade.

See our  food blog  to see other examples of the kinds of things we like to eat, feel free to email and ask us, if we might like to trade for what you've got.






(Please send us a photo of the food you want to trade. . . . and please no cookies, candies, baked goods, etc., we need to watch those carbohydrates.)

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